Students from the University of South Alabama College of Medicine recently attended a simulation lab on neuro lumbar punctures. When the students entered, a mid-section of a manikin was on the examination table. Jose Sanchez, M.D., a second-year neurology resident with USA Health, quizzed the students about the procedure as they entered.

Published Nov 7th, 2019

By Carlie Shively

cshively@health.southalabama.edu

USA Health University Hospital recently renovated two simulation labs – a partial-task training room and a multimedia conference room allowing for digital – proving beneficial for medical students.

Students from the University of South Alabama College of Medicine recently attended a simulation lab on neuro lumbar punctures. When the students entered, a mid-section of a manikin was on the examination table. Jose Sanchez, M.D., a second-year neurology resident with USA Health, quizzed the students about the procedure as they entered.

After the questions, Sanchez demonstrated and explained the procedure step by step for the students. One by one, the students approached the table and performed the procedure on the manikin successfully.

The renovation of the simulation lab at University Hospital better accommodates the busy schedules of students and clinicians. It allows them to practice on manikins during their down time without having to go far from their real patients.

“Simulation supports learning by immersing learners in the experience. From lumbar punctures to life-saving interventions such as CPR, simulations is a safe environment in which clinicians can practice and hone their skills,” said Alison Rudd, Ed.D, FNP-C, assistant professor and assistant director of the USA Simulation Program. “It provides a safe learning environment in which to practice. If a mistake is made, we simply press the ‘reset’ button.”

In the simulation lab, the students are able to witness scenarios like cardiac and pulmonary resuscitation, emergency childbirth and trauma assessment. They also get to practice procedures such as suturing, lumbar punctures, intubation and IV insertion.

“Medical decision making and interventions are skills that should be practiced," Rudd said. "There is no better place to start than a sim lab."

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