USA COM Graduates 200115 145152

Satisfaction high among USA College of Medicine graduates

Reflecting on their satisfaction with their medical education experiences, graduates of the University of South Alabama College of Medicine give their alma mater high marks.

Published Jan 15th, 2020

By Carol McPhail

CMcPhail@health.southalabama.edu

Reflecting on their satisfaction with their medical education experiences, graduates of the University of South Alabama College of Medicine give their alma mater high marks.

Results from the 2019 Medical School Graduation Questionnaire, administered annually by the Association of American Medical Colleges, showed that 98 percent of graduating students at the USA College of Medicine were satisfied overall with their medical education, compared with 89 percent nationwide.

The stellar results are not new. Satisfaction rates among USA College of Medicine graduates have remained between 92 percent and 98 percent since at least 2014, according to AAMC statistics.

“It is extremely rewarding to see that students value the quality of the educational program put together by a fantastic group of dedicated faculty,” said T.J. Hundley, M.D., associate dean for medical education for the USA College of Medicine.

Hundley praised faculty members for investing time and effort into designing, implementing and continuously improving the medical education program. “Our medical educators work incredibly hard to organize and deliver a high-quality product every year,” he said.

Data from the AAMC questionnaire allow medical schools to monitor trends and address them. “The results are used by course directors, faculty and the curriculum committee to further refine and improve the curriculum,” Hundley said.

Among other results from the 2019 questionnaire:

  • 91 percent of USA College of Medicine students agreed or strongly agreed that basic science education included sufficient illustrations of clinical relevance, compared with 75 percent of students nationally.
  • 91 percent of USA College of Medicine students agreed or strongly agreed that their required clinical experiences integrated basic sciences content, compared with 80 percent of students nationally.
  • 95 percent agreed or strongly agreed that they acquired clinical skills required to begin a residency program, compared with 91 percent of students nationally.

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