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A large inflatable brain offered visitors an interactive experience to learn how the brain works from the inside out.

Published Oct 25th, 2023

By Michelle Ryan
mryan@health.southalabama.edu

The USA Health Comprehensive Stroke Center took advantage of the crowd at Hancock Whitney Stadium ahead of the Jags matchup against Southern Miss on Tuesday, Oct. 17, to raise awareness about stroke, its symptoms and prevention. 

A large inflatable brain offered visitors an interactive experience to learn how the brain works from the inside out. The walk-through exhibit, stationed at one of the stadium’s main gates, featured information about stroke treatment and warning signs, concussions, brain trauma, Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis and more. 

Shelia Ross, D.N.P., the stroke program director at USA Health, said knowing the signs and symptoms of a stroke is important, but time is of the essence. 

“Calling 9-1-1 and using EMS providers to be transported ensures timely care. They take care of you on the way, gather information and notify the hospital teams about three to five minutes out,” she said. “We activate our process in the hospital and our stroke team is waiting for the patient to arrive. It happens very quickly, but it saves time.” 

View photos.

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